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This man found something inside an old chimney that changed history as we know it.

The chimney is a pretty and useful accessory to have when living in colder climates. The fascinating household accessory has many fascinating things about it. It gives the house a feeling of coziness as it warms everyone in the household through long, chilly nights. It’s no wonder why most people think of the fireplace as the focal point of their homes.

Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy

However, chimneys are not exempted from old age and once a house gets forgotten, the chimney slowly succumbs to deterioration. Luckily, persistent renovators are always ready to give a house a makeover to make it look good as new. However, when one unnamed man from Aberdeen, North East Scotland began cleaning out a chimney for renovation, he discovered something amazing.

Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy

Much like any person might do when cleaning a chimney, the man removed the stuff blocking the airways. He was able to extract a raggedy piece of cloth that looked like it was used by previous house owners to block a cold draft going through the chimney.

Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy

He initially wanted to throw out the dirty cloth. It looked grimy and dusty. The cloth also seemed to be falling into pieces so he thought it was something unimportant.

Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy

He was about to throw the junk cloth when he noticed that it had a piece of writing to it. It seemed like the junk he found isn’t what it seemed to be.

Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy

It was actually a big piece of parchment. The writings were not just plain scribbles, but instead markings and shapes of what looked to be a map.

Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy
Source: BoredomTherapy

The man took the old and tattered map to the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh. Restoration experts worked tirelessly to mend the old map piece by piece.

It turned out that the huge seven feet long and five feet wide map was drawn by George Wildley of London. This became one of the most important pieces in London’s history.

“It would have been very easy for this map to end up at the bottom of a skip, but thankfully, it can now take its place among the magnificent maps held within our collection,” said Dr. John Scally of the National Library of London.

Source: boredomtherapy

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